21st Century Transportation for Colorado

CONNECTING COLORADO—Driving is down, while demand for more transportation options is on the rise. New transportation options could help Coloradans avoid traffic, while reducing pollution and improving our communities.

GIVING COLORADANS TRANSPORTATION OPTIONS

Changing Transportation: CoPIRG Foundation's series of reports on the dramatic changes underway in how Americans travel.

Our ground-breaking research has documented a fundamental shift in the travel patterns of Coloradans - we are driving less and using alternatives like transit, bike and pedestrian travel more. 

Here’s what we’re already seeing in Colorado:

  1. Colorado saw the sixth largest drop in driving of any state in the country since 2005. That means the average Coloradan is driving 1,172 miles less than in 2005.
  2. Ridership on public transit is soaring and communities from Denver to Glenwood Springs are opening new dedicated bus lanes and light-rail lines.
  3. Colorado is poised to launch a statewide regional bus service connecting communities along I-70 and I-25.
  4. New technologies are creating new transportation options from bike-shares to ride-shares.
  5. Colorado freed up $250 million annually for cities and counties to invest in safe sidewalks, bike infrastructure and new buses.
  6. Statewide high-speed rail is being considered as a solution to interstate gridlock along I-70 and I-25.

Unfortunately, funding for these alternatives is not meeting demand and too many highway-widening projects are under consideration.

We're helping communities organize and bring transportation alternatives to their cities and towns.

Issue updates

News Release | CoPIRG Foundation | Transportation

41 Local Government Leaders Sign Letter Supporting Bustang

Today, CoPIRG Foundation Director Danny Katz delivered a letter to the Transportation Commissioners for the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) celebrating the success of Bustang, the statewide bus service, and showing support for continued expansion. The letter was signed by 41 mayors, city councilors, trustees and county commissioners from communities along the Bustang routes including Colorado Springs, Fort Collins, Idaho Springs, Summit County, Eagle County, Vail, Avon, and Glenwood Springs.    

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News Release | CoPIRG | Transportation

Electric Vehicle Charging Stations, Cleaner Buses Included in $68 Million VW Settlement Proposal

Consumer and environmental groups applauded the Colorado Department of Public Health and the Environment’s (CDPHE) draft plan to spend the $68 million that Colorado will receive from Volkswagen’s (VW) settlement over their emission-cheating vehicles. The plan, released on Monday, would steer $10 million into electric vehicle charging stations that could cover many of Colorado’s major roads as well as building electric charging stations at workplaces and apartments. $36 million would incentivize government agencies and the private sector to upgrade diesel-powered trucks and buses to electric powered. 

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News Release | CoPIRG Foundation | Transportation

Bustang Ridership Increases 52% in 2nd Year

Ridership on Bustang, which provides bus service connecting Denver to Fort Collins, Colorado Springs and mountain communities along I-70, swelled 52% in its second year, providing 155,864 passenger trips, according to the public interest group CoPIRG Foundation. To mark the 2nd anniversary of Bustang service and show broad public support, CoPIRG Foundation staff stood at Bustang’s gate in Denver’s Union Station and gathered signatures on a large, colorful, birthday card made out to the Colorado Department of Transportation, which operates the statewide bus service. 

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News Release | CoPIRG Foundation | Transportation

Colorado Needs to Invest $1.05 Billion Annually in Transit, Walking and Biking

With Colorado poised to spend billions of dollars on transportation in the coming years, a new report released today by the CoPIRG Foundation and the Southwest Energy Efficiency Project (SWEEP) finds that Colorado needs to invest at least $1.05 billion per year in transit, biking, and pedestrian infrastructure and services to meet the demands and challenges of the state’s shifting demographics and growing population.

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Report | CoPIRG Foundation | Transportation

Infographics: Colorado's Transit, Walking and Biking Needs

Infographics for Colorado's Transit, Walking and Biking Needs

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News Release | CoPIRG Foundation | Transportation

Federal Highway Administration Quietly Acknowledges the Driving Boom is Over

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) has very quietly acknowledged that the Driving Boom is over, which will help avoid wasting billions of dollars for unnecessary highway expansion.

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News Release | CoPIRG Foundation | Transportation

New Study: Traffic Data Does Not Support Current Plans to Spend $153 Million to Add Lanes on Colorado Route 470

A new report by the CoPIRG Foundation identifies state plans to add lanes on Route-470 as a national example of wasteful highway spending based on outdated assumptions. The study calls for instead investing scarce transportation dollars to better maintain existing roads and provide more transportation choices such as expanding transit and bike paths.

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Media Hit | Transportation

Toll roads causing problems, but Colorado says it's immune

Colorado's controversial plunge into public-private partnerships to oversee and collect tolls from local highways comes as credit agencies and other states are struggling with the arrangement, mostly because America's driving boom could be over.

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Media Hit | Transportation

Young Coloradans fueling drop in driving, study finds

Karen Rasmussen is on her way to work in Denver’s Uptown neighborhood, but instead of driving she’s walking down 17th Avenue – a change she's made since deciding to live without a car.

"It is wonderful," she says. "I spent a lot of time in traffic."

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Media Hit | Transportation

RAMBLIN' MAN: Transportation options sought as population increases

If you think the roads in El Paso County are bad now, just wait. The county's population is expected to balloon to nearly 1 million residents by the year 2040. .....

Alternatives to hitting the roads are available, there just aren't enough of them, says Danny Katz, director of Colorado Public Interest Group, a consumer advocacy group based in Denver.

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Blog Post

Kids need to be exposed to as little air pollution as possible. A key way that we can preserve the promises of the future is ensuring that the buses they take to and from school and field trips are powered by electricity and not fossil fuels. Xcel Energy has released their Transportation Electrification Plan (TEP), and this plan has a proposal to invest over $2 million in helping schools make the switch from dirty gas-powered school buses to clean electric school buses. 

Blog Post

 

On May 15th, Xcel Energy released their first Transportation Electrification Plan (TEP). It’s their proposal to spend $101.5 million on transportation electrification - things like the infrastructure to support more than 18,000 charging stations, 100,000 new electric vehicles, electric school buses, and community charging hubs.  One thing’s for sure: this is a big deal.

Blog Post

Five percent of the roads in the City and County of Denver account for fifty percent of the fatalities. These roads are often referred to as the High Injury Network and they are primarily arterials – the larger roads that cut across Denver. Think Federal, Colorado, and Colfax. Last week, CDOT stepped up to focus dollars on safety and multimodal improvements on them. 

News Release | CoPIRG Foundation and the Denver Streets Partnership

The Denver Streets Partnership issued its second annual report card and awarded an overall grade of C+ for the City and County of Denver's progress to meet their own Vision Zero Action Plan aimed at eliminating traffic fatalities and serious injuries. The Report Card focuses specifically on Denver’s progress meeting their goals on street safety improvements, such as building sidewalks and bike lanes.

News Release | CoPIRG

In a statement, Danny Katz, CoPIRG Director said “Clean car standards are a proven way to reduce air pollution while saving people at the pump. The advancements we’ve seen in fuel-efficient cars show these standards do not need to be changed. The Trump administration should drop their proposal to throw clean air efforts into reverse and should focus instead on protecting our health now and into the future.” 

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CoPIRG Foundation is part of The Public Interest Network, which operates and supports organizations committed to a shared vision of a better world and a strategic approach to getting things done.