21st Century Transportation for Colorado

CONNECTING COLORADO—Driving is down, while demand for more transportation options is on the rise. New transportation options could help Coloradans avoid traffic, while reducing pollution and improving our communities.

GIVING COLORADANS TRANSPORTATION OPTIONS

Changing Transportation: CoPIRG Foundation's series of reports on the dramatic changes underway in how Americans travel.

Our ground-breaking research has documented a fundamental shift in the travel patterns of Coloradans - we are driving less and using alternatives like transit, bike and pedestrian travel more. 

Here’s what we’re already seeing in Colorado:

  1. Colorado saw the sixth largest drop in driving of any state in the country since 2005. That means the average Coloradan is driving 1,172 miles less than in 2005.
  2. Ridership on public transit is soaring and communities from Denver to Glenwood Springs are opening new dedicated bus lanes and light-rail lines.
  3. Colorado is poised to launch a statewide regional bus service connecting communities along I-70 and I-25.
  4. New technologies are creating new transportation options from bike-shares to ride-shares.
  5. Colorado freed up $250 million annually for cities and counties to invest in safe sidewalks, bike infrastructure and new buses.
  6. Statewide high-speed rail is being considered as a solution to interstate gridlock along I-70 and I-25.

Unfortunately, funding for these alternatives is not meeting demand and too many highway-widening projects are under consideration.

We're helping communities organize and bring transportation alternatives to their cities and towns.

Issue updates

Media Hit | Transportation

CoPIRG Study Shows Coloradans Driving Less

According to a new study released by the Colorado Public Interest Research Group, the number of miles being driven by Americans is on the decline for the eighth year in a row.

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Media Hit | Transportation

Young Americans Lead Trend to Less Driving

For six decades, Americans have tended to drive more every year. But in the middle of the last decade, the number of miles driven — both over all and per capita — began to drop, notes a report to be published on Tuesday by U.S. Pirg, a nonprofit advocacy organization.

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Media Hit | Transportation

Millennial generation looking for new means of transportation

America's love affair with the car is dying and being replaced by a new generation's obsession with technology and different ways of getting around.

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News Release | CoPIRG | Transportation

New Report: Reduction in Driving Likely to Continue, Driving Boom Over

As the average number of miles driven by Americans heads into its eighth year of decline, a new report from the CoPIRG Foundation finds that the slowdown in driving is likely to continue. Baby Boomers are moving out of the phase in their life when they do the most commuting, while driving-averse Millennials move into that phase. These demographic changes will likely keep driving down for decades, according to the report.

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Report | CoPIRG | Transportation

New Direction

The Driving Boom—a six decade-long period of steady increases in per-capita driving in the United States—is over. This report reveals why and what the implications are.

> Keep Reading

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