21st Century Transportation for Colorado Updates

Report | CoPIRG Foundation | Transportation

Colorado’s Transit, Biking and Walking Needs Over the Next 25 Years

Transit, walking and biking are critical components of a 21st century transportation system in Colorado but have been underfunded for decades. Colorado needs to increase investments in transit, walking and biking by $1.05 billion dollars per year over the next 25 years to ensure every Coloradan in our towns and cities experiences the multitude of benefits that come from good access to adequate sidewalks, safe bicycle infrastructure including safe shoulders on rural highways, and good transit service within cities as well as a comprehensive statewide, bus-based, intercity transit system. 

News Release | CoPIRG Foundation | Transportation

Colorado Needs to Invest $1.05 Billion Annually in Transit, Walking and Biking

With Colorado poised to spend billions of dollars on transportation in the coming years, a new report released today by the CoPIRG Foundation and the Southwest Energy Efficiency Project (SWEEP) finds that Colorado needs to invest at least $1.05 billion per year in transit, biking, and pedestrian infrastructure and services to meet the demands and challenges of the state’s shifting demographics and growing population.

Report | CoPIRG Foundation | Transportation

Highway Boondoggles 2

Twelve proposed highway projects across the country – slated to cost at least $24 billion – exemplify the need for a fresh approach to transportation spending. These projects, some originally proposed decades ago, are either intended to address problems that do not exist or have serious negative impacts on surrounding communities that undercut their value. They are but a sampling of many questionable highway projects nationwide that could cost taxpayers tens of billions of dollars to build, and many more billions over the course of upcoming decades to maintain.

Report | CoPIRG Foundation and SWEEP | Transportation

Transportation Toolkit

This guide is intended to give you a sense of what some of the options are for making our communities better places - places where residents can safely and comfortably get around by walking, riding a bike, or riding transit, in addition to driving. Whether you are headed to school, work, the store or entertainment, there are too many places where the infrastructure, land use patterns and available services make it difficult to use your legs, your bike, a bus or a train (on their own or in combination). The good news is that all over Colorado, people have banded together with their local governments to make change. And you can too! Now’s a great time to push for multimodal transportation system in your community.

Report | CoPIRG Foundation | Transportation

Who Pays for Roads?

Many Americans believe that drivers pay the full cost of the roads they use through gas taxes and other user fees. That has never been true, and it is less true now than at any other point in modern times. Today, general taxes paid by all taxpayers cover nearly as much of the cost of building and maintaining highways as the gas tax and other fees paid by drivers. The purchasing power of gasoline taxes has declined as a result of inflation, improved vehicle fuel economy, and the recent stagnation in driving. As a result, so-called “user fees” cover a shrinking share of transportation costs.

News Release | CoPIRG Foundation | Transportation

New Report Finds Drivers Pay Less Than Half the Cost of Roads

With the nation’s primary federal transportation funding source set to expire this month and a number of state level funding proposals failing to pass before the state legislature adjourned, a new report from the CoPIRG Foundation and Frontier Group breaks the myth around who actually pays for roads in Colorado. The new report, “Who Pays for Roads?” finds that drivers currently pay less than half the total cost of roads and the average household pays $597 a year over and above any gas taxes or other fees they pay when they drive.

Report | CoPIRG Foundation | Transportation

The Innovative Transportation Index

This report reviews the availability of 11 technology-enabled transportation services – including online ridesourcing, carsharing, ridesharing, taxi hailing, static and real-time transit information, multi-modal apps, and virtual transit ticketing – in 70 U.S. cities. It finds that residents of 19 cities, with a combined population of nearly 28 million people, have access to eight or more of these services, with other cities catching up rapidly.

Report | CoPIRG Foundation | Transportation

Millennials in Motion

Millennials are less car-focused than older Americans and previous generations of young people, and their transportation behaviors continue to change in ways that reduce driving. Now is the time for the nation’s transportation policies to acknowledge, accommodate and support Millennials’ demands for a greater array of transportation choices.

News Release | CoPIRG Foundation | Transportation

New Study: Traffic Data Does Not Support Current Plans to Spend $153 Million to Add Lanes on Colorado Route 470

A new report by the CoPIRG Foundation identifies state plans to add lanes on Route-470 as a national example of wasteful highway spending based on outdated assumptions. The study calls for instead investing scarce transportation dollars to better maintain existing roads and provide more transportation choices such as expanding transit and bike paths.

Support us

Your tax-deductible donation supports CoPIRG Foundation's work to educate the public on the issues that matter, especially when powerful special interests are blocking progress.

Learn More

You can also support CoPIRG Foundation’s work through bequests, contributions from life insurance or retirement plans, securities contributions and vehicle donations.